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Tuesday Morning - August 13, 2013

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August 13, 2013

Table of Contents

Federal Policy

2015 Dietary Guidelines Process is in Full Swing
SNA and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation Release Breakfast Materials - Still Available
Competitive Foods Update: Interim Final Rule Published, SNA Task Force Reconvenes
USDA Has New Videos on MyPlate Kids’ Place
New Farm to School Geographic Preference Resources

State Policy

Maryland County to Turn of Vending Machines After School
Arizona Ahead of “Smart Snack” Rules
Georgia School Offering Wider Variety of Fruits and Veggies
Miami Schools Looking to Use Food Trucks for Students

Reports, Webinars, and Events

CDC Reports that Obesity Rates Declined Among Low-Income Preschoolers
IOM Releases Consensus Report on Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts
Pew and Robert Wood Johnson Paper on Health Impact of Proposed SNAP Cuts
Webinar: How Faith and Community Leaders Can Help Families Live Healthier and More Active Lives
Ready for Recess: Changing Policy and Practice to Support Students' Physical Activity

Upcoming Meetings and Events


Federal Policy

2015 Dietary Guidelines Process is in Full Swing

The Departments of Health and Human Services and Agriculture have announced the establishment of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC). This process happens every 5 years. The DGAC is expected to convene five public meetings; the first meeting was held on June 13 - 14, 2013. The Committee’s recommendations and rationale will be presented in a report to both the Secretaries of Health and Human Services and Agriculture, and will serve as a basis for the eighth edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This serves as a policy document for which all dietary guidance for Americans is based upon.

SNA will be drafting comments to be included in the record and monitoring the process closely. You are encouraged to submit comments, as well. To view archived webinars from public meetings, submit comments, and see the full calendar of events, click here.

SNA and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation Release Breakfast Materials

In collaboration with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, SNA’s Nutrition Committee created materials with examples of breakfast menus that meet the new meal pattern standards for school breakfast. SNA and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation released this guide earlier this month at the Association’s Annual National Conference (ANC) in Kansas City. To access this resource, click here.

Competitive Foods Update: Interim Final Rule Published

USDA FNS has published an interim final rule for Competitive Foods entitled, National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. SNA is in the process of reviewing and analyzing the rule, as well as determining next steps in response to the rule. This interim final rule amends the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program regulations to establish nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools. There is a 120 day comment period for the interim final rule and written comments on the rule are accepted at Regulations.gov until October 28, 2013. SNA will reconvene the Competitive Task Force in order to develop an official Association position.

See www.schoolnutrition.org/competitivefoods for the Interim Final Rule, SNA’s Press Release, and a list of a number of news articles on the topic quoting then SNA President Sandra Ford, SNS. Other resources include the OFW Memo on the Interim Final Rule and a side-by-side comparison (in Excel) of SNA’s recommendations (view comments) and the Interim Final Rule.

USDA Has New Videos on MyPlate Kids’ Place

The ChooseMyPlate website has several new videos that are sure to inspire you to make changes... motivate you to eat healthier... and make you laugh out loud . Check out our MyPlate Kids' Place videos page for more!

New Farm to School Geographic Preference Resources

One of the best tools for schools looking to buy local food is the geographic preference option, which allows purchasers to include language in solicitations so that vendors who can supply local products have an edge. Schools get to decide for themselves how to define local, how much preference to give to local items, and how exactly to structure their solicitations. Now, two new resources are available to help schools incorporate geographic preference correctly and successfully.

The USDA farm to school team recently developed a fact sheet titled Geographic Preference: What it is and how to use it, which gives a quick overview of the law and associated regulations and then walks through three ways to use the geographic preference option. In addition, School Food FOCUS has just released Geographic Preference: A primer on purchasing fresh local food for schools, which provides step-by-step guidance on how to implement a geographic preference policy, starting with articulating the legal authority and rationale for buying local foods. For more helpful procurement links, check out this resources page.

State Policy

Maryland County to Turn of Vending Machines After School

Montgomery County in Maryland will be keeping vending machines turned off after school thanks to a collaborative effort between officials and parent groups. The group, Real Food for Kids, also seeks nutritional reform beyond the county as the group wants to ban all vending machines from selling foods that don’t match school system’s wellness guidelines. The organization recently applied for a grant to develop such legislation statewide.

Arizona Ahead of “Smart Snack” Rules

Some Arizona officials are welcoming the new USDA Smart Snack rules declaring that the state implemented similar nutritional guidelines in 2006. But others are worried there will not be enough time to study the impact of the new rules on students’ diets or to get the new food choices in place. Some local officials are worried about the effect of tighter regulations on vending-machine sales, a source of revenue for some schools.

Georgia School Offering Wider Variety of Fruits and Veggies

Due to a push to provide more local produce, schools across Georgia will be offering a wider variety of fruits and vegetables. The thought is that if students are provided with more options, they will be more likely to eat the food vs. throwing it away. Also, some schools will start providing a full cup of fruit with breakfast three days a week to prepare students for the school breakfast program changes coming in 2014.

Miami Schools Looking to Use Food Trucks for Students

Miami Schools are capitalizing on popularity of food trucks to provide healthy meals to students. Miami-Dade County Public Schools first rolled out a food truck last summer as a way to deliver healthy meals to students for free at no cost to the district, thanks to partnerships with sponsors. The truck is more complicated to organize during the school year because the district must accept payment for lunch or account for students who receive free or reduced-price lunch. Schedules must be organized with principals, appropriate parking spots have to be identified and even details such as where to put the garbage need to be ironed out. Principals, parents and students say the hard work is worthwhile.


Reports, Webinars, and Events

CDC Reports that Obesity Rates Declined Among Low-Income Preschoolers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that obesity among low-income preschoolers dropped slightly in 19 states and U.S. territories from 2008 to 2011. According to the CDC, obese children are more likely to become obese adults and suffer lifelong physical and mental health problems. Obesity rates in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and now are showing small declines in many states. The report found that the obesity rate in Florida, Georgia, Missouri, New Jersey, South Dakota and the U.S. Virgin Islands declined at least one percentage point . Rates in 20 states and Puerto Rico held steady, and rates in several states — including Colorado, Tennessee and Pennsylvania — increased. Researchers said the states where obesity rates have declined have taken action to incorporate healthy eating and active living into children’s lives.

Click here for an article found in the Washington Post.
For more statistics on Childhood Obesity, see the CDC’s site.

IOM Releases Consensus Report on Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts

According to the IOM, Obesity poses one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century, creating serious health, economic, and social consequences. Despite acceleration in efforts to characterize, comprehend, and act on this problem, further understanding is needed on the progress and effectiveness of implemented preventive interventions.

An IOM committee developed a concise and actionable plan for measuring the nation’s progress in obesity prevention efforts – specifically, the success of policy and environmental strategies recommended in the 2012 IOM report Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention: Solving the Weight of the Nation. The committee’s consensus report on Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts offers a framework that will provide guidance for systematic and routine planning, implementation, and evaluation of the advancement of obesity prevention efforts.

Pew and Robert Wood Johnson Paper on Health Impact of Proposed SNAP Cuts

A new study from the Health Impact Project—a collaboration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts—examines the potential health impacts and health-related costs of proposed changes to SNAP now under consideration by Congress. The analysis found that as many as 5.1 million people could lose SNAP eligibility; among these are 1.4 million children and nearly 900,000 older adults. The proposed changes could also increase the number of Americans who live in poverty and who have difficulty getting enough to eat. Other findings:

  • As many as 1.2 million school-age children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals would lose SNAP eligibility. In addition, an estimated 156,000 to approximately 210,000 school-age children would not receive free school meals despite being eligible.
  • As many as 160,000 to 305,000 more people could become food insecure (i.e. have difficulty getting enough to eat).

Click here to read more.

Webinar: How Faith and Community Leaders Can Help Families Live Healthier and More Active Lives

Let's Move Faith & Communities is teaming up with the National Institutes of Health's We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity & Nutrition)® program! As a result of this collaboration, faith and community leaders can join online trainings and learn how to use We Can! materials and resources to help families help children maintain a healthy weight.

These webinars are part of a series of online training opportunities equipping health leaders to run We Can! in their communities. We Can! is a science-based national education program that offers tools and resources for parents, caregivers and communities helping families improve food choices, increase physical activity and reduce screen time. We Can! provides completion certificates (upon request) for individuals who attend a training.

The next webinar, “Energize Our Families Parent Program”, will be held on Wednesday, August 28, 1-3pm EDT.

If you wish to participate in this webinar, register here:
https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/259185751

Ready for Recess: Changing Policy and Practice to Support Students' Physical Activity

Sponsored Active Living Research, Public Health Institute, and Ready for Recess
Tuesday, September 10th, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. (EDT) - in person or via webinar
1724 Massachusetts Avenue, NW


Upcoming Meetings and Events

August 4-7, 2013, Minnesota State Conference, Rochester, MN
August 6-7, 2013, Washington State Conference, Yakima, WA
August 13-14, 2013, New Jersey State Conference, East Brunswick, NJ
September 26-28, Arizona State Conference, Glendale, AZ


 
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