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Tuesday Morning - June 14, 2011

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June 14, 2011

Table of Contents

SNA/USDA Webinar Registration Closed

Exciting Sessions to Attend at ANC

USDA Interim Rule on Sections 205 and 206

FRAC Report: Participation in Summer Nutrition Programs Continues Downward Trend

Agriculture Secretary Joins Nutrition Partners to Highlight Childhood Hunger Campaign and Summer Food Service Program for Kids

NFSMI's HealthierUS School Challenge Webinar

Cost of Raising a Child Born in 2010: $226,920

In Every Issue

SNA Legislative Action Center

Legislative Toolkit

SNA/USDA Webinar Registration Closed

We have reached our maximum capacity of participants allowed for today’s webinar but it will be posted on the SNA website shortly after the discussion. The webinar will answer questions surrounding the implementation of Sections 205 and 206 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, the two provisions that directly affect the price school nutrition programs can charge for school meals. It will take place on Tuesday, June 14th from 2 – 3:15 PM EST.

During the webinar, representatives from USDA will discuss Sections 205 and 206, including the soon to be released interim rule on implementing these sections. Section 205 is the Meal Price Equity provision, which requires school food authorities (SFA) to raise the price of paid meals if the price charged to students does not meet or exceed the federal reimbursement for free meals. Section 206 sets guidelines for how much revenue from a la carte lines and vending machines may be used in support of the district’s school nutrition program.

Additionally, USDA will provide a status report on the implementation of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act as well as a brief recap of the proposed meal pattern regulation. The webinar will also include SNA’s Public Policy and Legislation Committee Chair Melanie Konarik, SNS.

For those individuals who are not able to access the webinar, it will be archived on the SNA website within one week. Please visit the SNA website to access the archived version.

Want to submit your questions in advance? Post questions here on SNN!

Exciting Sessions to Attend at ANC

Given the interest in USDA’s interim rule addressing Sections 205 and 206, SNA has added two new sessions as “hot” topics at this year’s Annual National Conference. The first session will be on Monday, July 11 from 2:15-3:15PM and the second session will be on Tuesday, July 12 also from 2:15-3:15PM. Anita Pereira-Sekhon will be discussing Section 205, the paid meal equity provision. Cindy Long and Edward Harper will be presenting the latest information on section 206, revenue requirements for competitive foods. Additionally, these sessions will cover some of the other primary provisions in the law, as well as, provide an opportunity to discuss how SNA members and industry partners can work together to educate and re-educate the new and returning members of the 112th Congress. You do not want to miss these educational sessions!

USDA Interim Rule on Sections 205 and 206

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service has released the Interim Rule on Sections 205 and 206 entitled “National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.” The Rule gives guidance to school food authorities (SFAs) on how to implement these two provisions. In particular, it highlights how to handle revenue from paid reimbursable meals and food sold from outside of reimbursable meals but purchased through the school food service account funds. Additionally, there is a question and answer section from inquiries sent in by SFAs; a step by step guide that provides detailed information on determining SFAs average price for paid lunches, how to determine if price increases are needed and how much revenue can be added from non-Federal sources to the food service account to avoid a price increase. A useful Excel-based tool for SFAs is explained to determine the current average price for paid lunches and the new average paid lunch price requirement. This tool can also be used to determine the total amount of non- Federal revenue that an SFA would need to contribute if it chooses not to raise its average paid lunch price.

This Rule has not yet been reviewed by the Office of the Federal Register for publication, so there may be a few editorial differences between this version of the Interim Rule and the final version that will appear in the Federal Register. A copy of the Interim Rule is available for public viewing prior to publication in the Federal Register in order to provide the public an early opportunity to view this rulemaking and prepare for the July 1 implementation date.

Comments on the Interim Rule may be submitted online through http://www.regulations.gov, by fax at (703) 305-2879, attention Julie Brewer, or by mail addressed to: Julie Brewer, Chief, Policy and Program Development Branch, Child Nutrition Division, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 640, Alexandria, Virginia 22302-1594.

The memo on the interim rule release can be found at: http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Governance/Policy-Memos/2011/SP39-2011_os.pdf

FRAC Report: Participation in Summer Nutrition Programs Continues Downward Trend

Since July 2008, nationwide participation in summer nutrition programs has dropped by 90,000 children, according to Hunger Doesn’t Take a Vacation, an analysis by the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC).

“While participation in other federal nutrition programs grew rapidly because of the recession, participation in the Summer Nutrition Programs continued to slide. It’s time to reverse this trend. This is a time for action,” said Jim Weill, FRAC president.

FRAC measures the impact of summer nutrition programs across the nation by comparing the number of low-income children receiving summer meals to those receiving free and reduced-price school meals during the regular school year. In July 2010, only 15 of every 100 low-income students, who received lunch on an average day in the 2009-2010 school year, received summer nutrition, a decrease from the 2009 ratio of 16 of every 100.

For more information, visit: www.frac.org.

Agriculture Secretary Joins Nutrition Partners to Highlight Childhood Hunger Campaign and Summer Food Service Program for Kids

USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack joined Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and No Kid Hungry National Campaign spokesperson Jeff Bridges on Tuesday, June 7 to launch the Virginia No Kid Hungry Campaign, a public-private partnership that will connect Virginia's children and teens to school breakfast and child care nutrition programs, including summer meals programs. Vilsack highlighted the importance of USDA's Summer Food Service Program which helps children get the nutrition they need during the summer months when schools are out for summer break.

"The health and wellbeing of our nation is dependent on the health of our children, and no child should ever have to go hungry," said Vilsack. "USDA works to provide low-income kids nutritious meals during the school year and in the summer so they can learn, grow, and reach their full potential. We know that our strength comes from our partnerships, and it will take everyone—government agencies, educators, elected officials, corporations, advocates and community leaders—to ensure that our children have a healthy start in life."

More than 80 percent of those eligible for free and reduced-price school meals can get free summer meals but do not participate. This campaign will work to connect more than 1.8 million Virginia children and teens to school breakfast and child care nutrition programs. The Virginia Summer Meals for Kids Program is funded by the USDA and provides children free summer meals at hundreds of sites across the state.

For more information, please visit: http://content.govdelivery.com/bulletins/gd/USDAOC-87e47

NFSMI's HealthierUS School Challenge Webinar

Registration is open for NFSMI's HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) Webinar. It will be held on Tuesday, June 14 at 1:00PM CDT (2:00PM EDT). Webinar participants will learn about resources that will help them apply for the HUSSC award for their school or district. Panelists include: Gaye Lynn MacDonald, Becke Bounds, Eric Knutson, and Dennis Barrett.

To learn more, or to register, click here.

Cost of Raising a Child Born in 2010: $226,920

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its annual report, Expenditures on Children by Families, finding that a middle-income family with a child born in 2010 will spend about $226,920 ($286,860 if projected inflation costs are factored in) for food, shelter, and other necessities to raise that child over the next 17 years. This represents a 2 percent increase from 2009. Expenses for transportation, child care, education, and health care saw the largest percentage increases related to child rearing since 2009. Very small changes were seen in housing, food, clothing, and other expenses on a child since 2009.

The report, issued annually by USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, is a valuable resource to courts and state governments in determining child support guidelines and foster care payments. For the year 2010, per child annual child-rearing expenses for a middle-income, two-parent family range from $11,880 to $13,830, depending on the age of the child.

The report notes that family income greatly affects child rearing costs. A family earning less than $57,600 per year can expect to spend a total of $163,440 (in 2010 dollars) from birth through high school. Similarly, parents with an income between $57,600 and $99,730 can expect to spend $226,920; and a family earning more than $99,730 can expect to spend $377,040.

The full report is available at www.cnpp.usda.gov.


 
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